The ECHO Theory

In the modern age, we are constantly inundated with a plethora of information. When accosted with this constant stream of consciousness, it is necessary to filter out and focus on only the topics that appeal to you. However, this human defense mechanism has its downsides, as often times, more “important” issues will be overshadowed by shallower, yet viscerally satisfying topics. For example, a quick look at the Yahoo front page will reveal a scroll bar of “top stories” that the editors feel are most likely to be read. Near the top of the list are banal tales of Celebrity weddings and shallow fashion advice. In contrast, more “important” stories, like political upheavals, are thrown to the wayside.

According to DailyBeatsMotion.com, these are the top trending topics from September 2012:

Here are the top 10 Twitter Trends for September 2012, ranked by the number of days on which they trended in at least one major metro area in the US.

  1. #nowplaying: (29 days) –
  2. Bonanza: (26 days)
  3. Cali: (26 days)
  4. #job: (26 days)
  5. #oomf:  (24 days)
  6. #blessed: (23 days)
  7. Facebook: (22 days)
  8. Calm: (22 days)
  9. Netflix: (21 days)
  10. #news: (21 days)

The goal of this project is to expose this unfortunate truth, which is accomplished by counting the number of Tweets under the hashtags: #firstworldproblems #humblebrag #yolo; allowing us a glimpse into the true concerns of the modern age. These concepts are going to be represented by a droning sound, which represents the numbing drone of the twitter feed. To draw attention to this, we will also monitor the hashtags of a few, more “important”, tweets: like human rights and the like. When our program detects these tweets, instead of a comfortable droning noise, a bit more dissonant, looping sound will play – hopefully jarring the listener.

These sounds will be playing all at once, which will cause a hellish cacophony – but this is the point.  We contribute to the noise of media with opinions and discussion every day through our tweets, but how many of them are making a difference?  By hacking the Twitter system and hashtags and making more of a clear dichotomy between “first world problems” and “real world problems,” and converting them into sound to make a little more sense of the scale of this problem, perhaps people will take pause and really consider how they perceive the world.

This is a social experiment and an exercise in observing the digital environment that has become an integral part of our lives. The Echo Theory is our attempt to drag the gems of decency from the shallow black lake of escapism. While, in and of itself, E.C.H.O cannot change the world, the resulting insight may bring our society to a higher state of digital and social awareness.